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High-End Collectibles

• Established 2007 •

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1552-1555 Carlos & Joanna Four Reale NGC About Unc. 55 [Antique Coin]

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2,599

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Sleeve Condition:

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Media Condition:

Very Good

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A need for circulating precious metal coinage arose shortly after Columbus claimed the New World for Spain in 1492. Spanish mints had produced silver and copper coins for use in the New World, but it was not until 1536 that the Mexico City mint would produce the first coins specifically struck in and for use in the Americas.

Thus, the Carlos and Joanna 4 Reale was produced, 250 years before the U.S. mint was even founded! This is the first time we’ve offered them and these are among the finest examples known today. Beautifully toned and completely original, these have been certified by NGC to be in near mint, AU-55 condition. We feel these early-issue four reales are absolutely solid values for the price.

The obverse features the great “Pillars of Hercules” with the text PLUS ULTRA which translates to “MORE BEYOND.” They are encircled by the Latin legend that declares ownership of Spain and the Indies. The Pillars of Hercules had long marked the Strait of Gibraltar separating the Atlantic Ocean and the Mediterranean Sea and in Greek mythology represented the barrier to the known world, a barrier not to cross. Thus, the pillars featured on colonial Spanish coinage symbolized and inspired the efforts to expand the empire beyond the known world. The reverse features the arms of the joint Castile and Leon, with a legend that translates to “Carlos and Joanna Kings”- the mother and son co-rulers of Spain and the Spanish Domain. The coat of arms is flanked by letters on either side that designate the Mexico City mint (“M”) on the left, and another letter on the right that designates the assayer of the silver.